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PostPosted: Mon Jul 22, 2013 6:33 am 
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Ainia wrote:

I was intrigued enough to return with some climbing gear to see if I could photograph a matching view for each painting. The results are quite interesting.



Yes, they are - well done! It must have taken a lot of work to get the pics to match up so perfectly. :D

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 27, 2013 1:05 am 
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Shorah Acorn1,

Yes, a lot of work indeed, but also entertaining and interesting (when I wasn't fretting about breaking my neck! :) )!!

Another April journal entry below.

===

Sunday 20 Apr 2013

More Teledahn Curiosities

In continuing to ponder the Teledahn questions from my last entry, I was startled to notice a familiar drawing on the Cleft work desk. I don’t recall ever noting it before, so either have never noticed it at all, or had long forgotten its presence there.

[Reveal] Spoiler: A slightly ragged copy of a drawing also found in Sharper's Ae'gura office
Image

A copy of this drawing is pinned to the wall in Sharper’s Ae’gura office (the Baron’s office).

[Reveal] Spoiler: A copy of the same drawing on the office wall
Image

[Reveal] Spoiler: An unrolled, flattened copy of the drawing
Image

I’ve been wondering exactly what these schematics are depicting. Presumably something in Teledahn since Sharper has displayed it alongside all the other Teledahn-related drawings. Mechanical works for *something* in the Age, no doubt. I PMd AlanD for his thoughts, as he’s an experienced engineer, and he had a most interesting idea regarding all these drawings…

There are several other drawings of interest in this office. The one on the desk has always struck me as a hodge-podge, rather like a scratch pad.

[Reveal] Spoiler: A second similar drawing on the office desk
Image

Unfortunately, the writing is pretty much indecipherable, though I’m pretty sure it *isn’t* D’ni. The grid looks calendar-like to me; perhaps showing a six-day work week? There are numerous labeled arrows which hint vaguely at a relationship between the odd central drawing and the shroomie silhouette drawn along the right edge. The four red rectangles at shroomie’s sides are a mystery, as is the rectangular pattern in the upper left corner. The presence of the Greek letter psi indicates that a surface dweller drew that part at least, though its surrounding medallion-like drawing is enigmatic. I haven’t yet fathomed which meaning of psi is intended here…

There is a third drawing that isn’t laid out anywhere in the room but is kept rolled up in a container along with copies of the other two drawings.

[Reveal] Spoiler: A third drawing rolled up and stored in a nearby container
Image

[Reveal] Spoiler: The same drawing unrolled and laid flat
Image

Unrolling it and laying it flat, it is quite a strange mix of drawings, with many elements of the other two drawings superimposed over each other, as well as some new images. It looks very much like a practice sheet, though it also appears that a number of different artists are responsible for its numerous drawings.

In AlanD’s PM, he’s suggested that perhaps these sheets are examples of D’ni image storage technology, consisting of layered images that can be viewed or extracted using specialized equipment. He also suggested that Sharper had found and been experimenting with this equipment, creating the layered drawings we find in his Ae’gura and Teledahn offices. In pondering this possibility, I realize it makes a great deal of sense. Sharper wrote in his journal about discovering a cache of D’ni notes and journals in the Teledahn office above the control room and subsequently hiding it from the DRC. It would make a great deal of sense if he found additional D’ni items elsewhere that he would find a private place like the Baron’s office to test it, away from the DRC’s eyes and ears. It’s still a mystery where such equipment might be now, though…

The fact that Sharper kept these drawings here (and numerous copies of them, so far as I can tell) implies that he was using them, that he understood them; or perhaps that he even made them or added to them himself.

I have no idea why the first drawing was left at the Cleft, though. Everything else at the work desk there was drawn by Atrus in his youth. Would Atrus even have known about Teledahn? But who else might have left it there? Yeesha? Sharper? Nick? And *why* would someone leave it there at all??

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 27, 2013 1:14 am 
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Woah. That's weird that a Teledahn drawing would be in the Cleft! 0_0;

Also- the 'fused' picture is an odd one too, but a tad small for me to make anything out on. Is there a bigger version of it you can find?

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 27, 2013 1:50 am 
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Shorah Cal,

I assume you mean the third drawing when you talk about the "fused" one? In which case, the only place I have been able to find it so far is in the container inside the Baron's office. I got as close a shot as I could in that location. In order to unroll and flatten it:

[Reveal] Spoiler: OOC
I had to grab an extracted texture file (BTW, all the unrolled flattened images are extracted textures)

You can try downloading the image in the post and then zooming in on it using the image viewer of your choice...

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 27, 2013 3:09 am 
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Ainia wrote:
Shorah Cal,

I assume you mean the third drawing when you talk about the "fused" one? In which case, the only place I have been able to find it so far is in the container inside the Baron's office. I got as close a shot as I could in that location. In order to unroll and flatten it:

[Reveal] Spoiler: OOC
I had to grab an extracted texture file (BTW, all the unrolled flattened images are extracted textures)

You can try downloading the image in the post and then zooming in on it using the image viewer of your choice...


Yeah, that's the one I meant.

Odd that it's so small, though, compared to the others 0_0;

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 27, 2013 3:17 am 
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Shorah Cal,

[Reveal] Spoiler: OOC
Actually, all the textures are like that, though they will vary in size somewhat, depending... We are used to seeing them expanded/stretched in the game. I expect the smallish size of the texture files is a means to keep things as compact as possible within the game and so trim its use of computer/online resources.

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 27, 2013 3:44 am 
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[Reveal] Spoiler: OOC
Yeah, I get that. But it's odd that the middle one is bigger than the other two, is all. I'd expect them to all be similar sizes, or at least the ones that end up displayed properly, unlike the third one which is just rolled up all the time.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 08, 2013 7:58 am 
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Shorah everyone,

More April ponderings

===

Tuesday 29 Apr 2013

Keta, Gehn and the Amad

Quote:
Keta/Leira was a surface dweller from Earth.

--RAWA, November 14, 1997

* * * *
Quote:
Keta is Atrus’s mother. She is human.

--RAWA, June 2, 1998

* * * *
Quote:
Kenen ahtsoo? Shorah teh. Tahgahmem Tashn botaygahn shem b’fahsee.
[Is it ready (Testing?) Hi there(?) (Giggles, indistinct D’ni words) Thou knowest, I will love thee (forever).]

--Keta, date unknown

* * * *
Quote:
The construction of the imagers has proceeded without fault. It is interesting to see how easily I’ve been able to adapt the D’ni technology to mimic that of the Amad; in some ways the similarities between the two cultures was striking. I wonder if perhaps there had been communication or commerce between the two cultures in earlier times; maybe Keta’s people were even descendants of the D’ni. It pleases me to think so.

--Gehn, 83.5.14

* * * *
Quote:
It’s late and I cannot sleep. I’ve lost so much in my life. My people, my father, my son, and you my wife—Keta, you were the only true kindness I have ever known. Watching you flicker there in the Imager… I sometimes wonder if you were real. If I could restore your life with my pen, I would do so in an instant, and leave the rest of the world to their own wretched fate.

--Gehn, 87.6.20

Today’s enigma is Keta and the Amad. In addition to the above information we have, there is her inscription to Gehn on her photograph.

[Reveal] Spoiler: Keta
Image

Her inscription reads “To Gehn, my husband and my salvation. I dedicate myself to the love that rescued me.”

Although her imager message is spoken in D’ni, the photograph inscription is in English, implying that Keta was fluent in both. Could she have been taught one or both by Gehn? We do know that Gehn could speak and write both English and D’ni.

Keta’s utter devotion to Gehn says a great deal about her history, I think. She seemed to have been in dire straits of some sort when Gehn met her, for she attributes her very survival to him and remained poignantly grateful to him for the rest of her life.

Clearly, Gehn had some sort of exposure to the technology of Keta’s people. But I’m wondering if the Amad were a nearly-extinct race at the time Gehn encountered them. The few records we have seem to show that Keta had no one to turn to when she became ill while pregnant with Atrus. Gehn’s resentment of Anna and deep shame at being half human would have been powerful deterrents to visiting Anna at all. I think it extremely likely that he knew very well there was nowhere else to go in their time of crisis.

So perhaps Gehn found and tinkered with Amad technology in those earlier years; perhaps there was little left of the Amad glory days but the ruins of their homes and inventions. The only fairly solid dates we know about Gehn’s early life as a D’ni refugee are that he and Anna made their home at the Cleft when he was eight; he left to seek his fortune when he was 14; and he returned there with Keta when he was 19. So when he left home as a teenager, he would have traveled by foot, encountering the Amad somewhere during this time. Thus it seems quite likely that the Amad were not terribly far from the Cleft area, which would place them somewhere in the US southwestern regions or perhaps farther south in Mexico.

Of course, the lack of historical records of such a civilization there wouldn’t necessarily be a surprise. If they were a relatively small group even in their heyday, there probably wouldn’t have been much left to find in Gehn’s time. Plus he very likely would have retrieved everything he could of their technology after Keta’s death, if not before. This would fit very well with what we already know about his methods of teaching himself about the D’ni and the Art. I suppose it’s possible that he even moved everything he could manage from the Amad settlement directly to Riven or his 233rd Age in the days before he was trapped there by Atrus and Katran…

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 06, 2013 11:23 pm 
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Shorah everyone,

Another entry from late April.

===

Tuesday 29 Apr 2013

The Amad and the Gallina

I have been wondering who the Amad might have been in the times of Gehn and earlier.

There is a group of ancient New Mexican peoples called the Gallina, who were wiped out in the late 1200s it seems. One of the intriguing bits is that their architectural structures were somewhat unique compared to the other native peoples of those times. They are noted for their rounded stone towers, though the exact purpose of those towers is debated.

[Reveal] Spoiler: Ruins of a Gallina tower
Image

[Reveal] Spoiler: Ruins of a hidden village
Image

Another very interesting bit of the Gallina history is how they seem to have been hated and feared by the other natives. No one knows why, though I suspect some of the current-day tribes know but aren’t telling… for I found an interesting reference to an Anglo researcher speculating that the Jemez peoples were descendants of the Gallina; her report was met with anger by the Jemez peoples who insisted adamantly that they most certainly were *not* of Gallina ancestry. Sure sounds to me as though they know a great deal more about the Gallina than they are revealing to outsiders…

Quote:
Earlier that month, I had made a brief trip into the Gallina region, a broad valley extending north from Cuba, New Mexico. The area remains a cultural backwater well off the tourist track: poor villages, largely Hispanic, are scattered along the trickling headwaters of Capulin Creek. My guide was U.S. Forest Service archaeologist Bill Wyatt.

Archaeology in the Gallina area began relatively late. In 1937, Frank Hibben dug the Cerritos site, finding burned rooms and towers and eighteen bushels of burned corn. Two of the towers contained human skeletons; one still had three arrows embedded in its chest, another two arrows in the hip, yet another a severe wound above one eye. Hibben also found the skeleton of a female still holding a bow and some arrows.

From Hibben’s time to the present day, no part of the Anasazi domain has produced as much evidence of prehistoric violence as Gallina. More than half the excavated sites contain the remains of murdered men, women, and children. And though the valley lies far to the east and south of the Colorado Plateau, it too ceased to be occupied around 1300.

As I toured the valley with Wyatt, I realized that I had come across no stranger ruins anywhere in the Southwest. The normal height for Anasazi walls is about five feet. In Gallina, they average nine, and the walls are thicker than could possibly be required just to hold up the roofs. Each living site is guarded by a tall circular structure that may have been a lookout tower. In gloomy, cul-de-sac side canyons, small villages huddle on cramped ledges. “This whole place just breathes paranoia,” Wyatt said at one point. And later: “You get the feeling these were the bad guys. It’s as if the others said, ‘OK, you can live in this area, but we don’t want you showing up anywhere else.’”

From Gallina I drove south to Jemez Pueblo, where I met William Whatley, a long-haired maverick who for nine years has worked at the Pueblo, the last four as official Jemez tribal archaeologist. Like Bruce Bradley, Whatley had learned how to listen and not to ask rude questions. By fiercely championing Jemez claims for land and sacred objects, Whatley slowly gained the trust of the people.

Earlier ethnographers had concluded that the Jemez were the descendants of the Gallina Anasazi. Whatley flatly contradicted this assertion. As we sat on the porch of the visitor center, he told me the parts of the Jemez migration epic that he was allowed to share. “They have no Gallina stories,” he said. “You’ve seen those sites? They don’t look anything like Jemez dwellings. These people aren’t descended from Gallina.

“Over the years, the elders have given me pieces of the migration story. The whole thing takes twelve hours to tell. But the gist is this. The people came from the Four Corners area, somewhere near Sand Canyon. As they migrated south and east, they left markers. I’ve actually found some of these on the ground, just from the elders’ descriptions—markers that no living Jemez have ever seen.

“On their way here, an advance party of Jemez came through the Gallina area. At first they were treated hospitably by the people living there; then the Gallina turned around and killed the Jemez. The Gallina people didn’t realize that the large main body of Jemez was coming right behind. That main body eliminated all of Gallina, maybe in only a few days.”

I mused on the Jemez oral tradition, which, before Whatley, no Anglo had been privileged to learn. I realized that it explained a lot. It accounted for the end of the Gallina in 1300 and for the extensive evidence there of violent death. And it might be one more piece of the complex puzzle of the abandonment.

--David Roberts, “In Search of the Old Ones”, 2010

Many of the excavations done of ancient Gallina settlements reveal blitzkrieg-like massacres, where villagers were suddenly slaughtered and their bodies left to rot; or were dumped into their towers and burned. What could have inspired such fear and hatred in the other natives? What made the Gallina so different?

Perhaps they were a lost colony of D’ni settlers? Particularly if they had kept some of the D’ni technology and developed some variants of their own, they would have seemed odd to the other natives. Archeologists seem to think that the Gallina tended to keep to themselves, were reclusive, which ties in with the D’ni tendency toward isolationism.

At any rate, if any of this speculation holds water, it could explain how Gehn came to meet Keta during his surface wanderings. If her people were all but extinct, then she would have lived in fear, either by living in a secret, hidden location, or perhaps even as a maligned slave of another native tribe. Either way, Gehn would have pitied her as someone whose life mirrored his own history. And so perhaps Keta led Gehn to a cache of her people’s old technology.

Certainly, nothing now remains of that technology on the surface here in New Mexico. So once Gehn found it back in the 1700s, he must have removed it to Riven. It could well be that he spent many of those wandering surface years collecting all the Amad technology he could find. Many years later, long after Keta’s death, he wrote about the connections he believed the Amad had with the D’ni. Perhaps these early years helped to inspire his later obsession with all things D’ni.

[Reveal] Spoiler: One of Gehn's linking book "cages", powered on
Image

[Reveal] Spoiler: One of Gehn's linking book "cages", powered off
Image

[Reveal] Spoiler: One of Gehn's linking book "cages", powered on, viewed from the back; note the power cable
Image

[Reveal] Spoiler: Gehn's imager chair
Image

[Reveal] Spoiler: Gehn's personal hand-powered imager, containing Keta's recording
Image

[Reveal] Spoiler: Hand-powered schoolroom imager, containing Gehn's recording
Image

[Reveal] Spoiler: Gehn's temple imager
Image

[Reveal] Spoiler: Gehn's temple imager, closeup
Image

Amad technology seems to feature the rounded or “spider” cage structure, which apparently localizes and focuses energy streams of various sorts. With the imagers, the photons are focused inside the ball structure; with the linking books, the power activates the book’s linking ability. Apparently, most forms of this technology require power cabling; a connection to an external power source. This is most easily seen with the linking book cages. However, the smallest imagers, in the schoolroom and in Gehn’s bedroom, are hand-powered via a simple crank.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 12, 2013 8:04 am 
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Shorah again,

The last entry from April.

===

Tuesday 29 Apr 2013

The Mind of Gehn

I’ve always been intrigued with Gehn’s story. In trying to understand his view of life, I must start with his early experiences in D’ni.

Finding himself caught up in the controversy of a surface dweller becoming a part of D’ni society, he surely represented both the hopes and the fears of the D’ni who favored and abhorred the notion. It seems to me that once he was born, he took Ti’ana’s place as the object of the controversy; and he was far more helpless to cope with becoming such a target.

In his place, I think I would have been deeply conflicted, both loving and hating the human half and the D’ni half of myself. Considering the need to become a part of the D’ni world, ultimately one would feel compelled to reject the human half. Children long to fit in even more than adults and this would have been the only real option for Gehn to find a place and become accepted there.

It still puzzles me how readily Gehn blamed his mother for the tragic end to the D’ni civilization. Had his father Aitrus known the larger story, he would have done exactly what Ti’ana did—present the council with the evidence and let the council determine the right course of action. I suppose Ti’ana’s presence exposed the embedded racism within the D’ni, essentially forcing them as a culture to confront this flaw within themselves and then decide what to do about it. Obviously, it created some deep divisions, but I see this as an opportunity they had to grow up a bit more…

Gehn was eight years old when D’ni fell and he and his mother made their new home at the Cleft. Six years later, he left to find his fortune amongst the Terran surface dwellers. Five years after that, he returned to the Cleft with Keta, who then died giving birth to Atrus. Gehn was both a father and a widower at 19. Those five years with Keta seemed to have been the only happy times in his life up until that point; and retrospectively, the only truly happy times he ever knew throughout his life.

All I can do is speculate about what might have happened during those five lost years, but it seems that he found himself in a way, found happiness in wandering amongst the surface dwellers, and seemed to be deeply in love with Keta. She seems to be the only person he ever really loved.

So her loss was devastating. His “humanity” seemed to have been tied to his relationship with her and it crumbled away with her death. Gehn seems the epitome of a man become cynical and bitter about the idea of love. He had finally found something he’d longed for throughout his young life only to lose it with the birth of his only child. So Atrus unwittingly became the manifestation of Gehn’s duality, his inner turmoil. As was Gehn, Atrus also was part human, part D’ni; and Atrus was Keta’s gift to Gehn, a symbol of their deep love, as well as that which cost Keta her life. A love/hate paradox all over again.

Gehn had armored himself as a young child in D’ni; found a way to tolerate the racism and begin building a life and future for himself. He lost all that when D’ni fell but set out to replace it later when he left home. Once again, he began building a life and future for himself only to lose it again. It seems he must have decided that having hopes and attachments was too risky in the end, only a fool’s errand. And so he closed himself off forever to others. He became the aloof “g*d”** who was invulnerable and flawless. Perhaps he willed himself to become an idealized being, and then deluded himself into believing he had the power to ordain such a transformation. In the end, he went to enormous lengths to hide, to avoid…

I find myself wondering what might have happened differently if Keta had survived. Who would Gehn have become if he’d been able to grasp and keep his experience of love? And I wonder if Yeesha has ever considered intervening with Gehn as she did with Kadish…

===

[[**apparently the forum scripts object to the use of the word g*d (pronounced gawd) here and substitute the name Atrus... weird]]
[[could this be an obscure hint about things to come?? let the wild speculation begin!!!]]

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 14, 2013 11:20 pm 
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Some interesting thoughts there.

Gehn, first loses all respect of his peers simply because of who his parents are. Then, finally becoming accepted, he looses his entire civilization. Cast out, once again alone (for he clearly blames Ti'ana for that loss, likely all the ills of his life, being too young to truly understand what happened).

He leaves, meets Keta, and again feels that he can build a life. But that is cruelly taken from him again. Cheated again, unable to so much as look at Atrus, he leaves again.

During that time, he goes searcing for D'ni, likely to try and recapture some of his youth, as he likely saw it as the best time of his life. Finally finding D'ni, teaching himself to write, he returns to Atrus.

I think he did this for many reasons. First, as you mentioned Ania, it was his final gift from his beloved Keta. But I think it goes deeper than that. We already know that D'ni fertility isn't all that great (or they would have outgrown that cavern long ago). It's possible that he tried again to build a life, found a woman, and was unable to have another child. So wanting to have his legacy continue, he returned to Atrus to teach him to be D'ni.

During this time is when Gehn becomes like we know him, the man who believes himself a -god-. His complete inability to control anything in his life forces him to stick to the belief that he can create a world and control everything about it.

So it's becomes such a shock when Atrus, with the help of a so-called 'lower species' overthrows Gehn, and traps him on Riven. This last, final blow to his belief system was probably the final tipping point. This is where the villian that we meet in Riven is born. And yet, his kidnapping of Catherine is still, underneath everything, an attempt to correct what he must see as a mistake in trying to bring Atrus to D'ni and build a happy life with him.

Ghen is a man who craves control, because there was no point in his life where he had any.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 16, 2013 8:04 am 
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Shorah Magic88889,

Some very interesting thoughts! I see I am not the only explorer who finds Gehn an interesting character study. As you say, so true, control does seem to be classic ingredient in human drama. It's rather interesting that a man who is half D'ni ends up embodying *all* their worst faults.

I would dearly love to know more about Gehn's "lost" years on the surface...

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 18, 2013 5:30 am 
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Shorah everyone,

An entry from May.

===

Thursday 9 May 2013

The Cleft, The Lodge and Tomahna

Today’s enigma is the Cleft, the Lodge and Tomahna. Tomahna in the sense of the home Yeesha grew up in (rather than Tomahna as a name for the surface world of the D’ni Age).

According to the Book of Ti’ana, the Lodge was about 12 hours north of the Cleft and caldera (it took from sundown to dawn to walk there), so probably about 24 miles away. The Lodge was built upon a ledge jutting out from a rock wall rising from the desert floor, with a water source 60 feet below in a chasm. The Lodge itself is above the desert floor; the moon and desert landscape can be seen from the Lodge windows. And a nearby ridge overlooks the Lodge.

Although we already know that Wingrove never visited the locations when writing the three books, I have surmised that he must have been given recovered journals penned by Atrus and Ti’ana (and perhaps Aitrus and even Ti’ana’s father) as reference materials, in addition to Katran’s journals (which are the official sources of information used). It’s fairly likely that some of these journals contained the survey data done by Anna and her father; if this is so, then the descriptions of relative locations should be fairly accurate.

From The Stranger’s records of his visits to Tomahna, it’s clear that it was located within a reasonable distance from the Cleft and caldera, though it is far enough to warrant the use of a transport vehicle. During the days of Yeesha’s youth, it seems that Atrus used the Cleft for storage and so made frequent use of his transport vehicle to journey between the two locations.

I have been wondering if Atrus moved his family back to the Lodge when Yeesha was born, rebuilding it and renaming it Tomahna, the D’ni word for Resting Place or Home (more or less a direct translation from Lodge). From The Stranger’s records and images, it looks like Atrus modified the area considerably, adding numerous buildings, as well as research and power equipment. The images from The Stranger’s records certainly match the Wingrove descriptions of the Lodge quite well…

[Reveal] Spoiler: Tomahna atrium, daytime
Image

[Reveal] Spoiler: Tomahna atrium, night
Image


And in light of Atrus’s work on Tomahna, I’ve wondered about all the Ages Atrus Wrote and outfitted; he did an enormous amount of work on all of them and I’m not sure how he managed it. Although the D’ni are longer-lived, I rather doubt that he could have built everything we have seen by himself within that amount of time. Did he have the Bahro build it for him? Or did he have possession of the D’ni Descriptive Book? Either of those possibilities makes more sense than the notion that he managed to outfit dozens, if not hundreds, of Ages by hand.

[Reveal] Spoiler: Tomahna lake, daytime
Image

[Reveal] Spoiler: Tomahna lake, night
Image


The only direct information I have been able to find about Tomahna when Atrus lived there were the comments Katran made about it when The Stranger visited them there for the first time.

Quote:
Breathtaking, isn’t it? We call it Tomahna. We moved here after Atrus finished Writing Releeshahn. He wanted us to have a new home too.

--Katran, circa 1815

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 18, 2013 5:09 pm 
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Perhaps Atrus was able to make use of D'ni advanced unistructural extrusion building technology. Aside from what is said about the tunnel construction in the book of Ti'ana, we don't know how quick and subtle the technology became in the thousands of years since it was invented. Atrus, being a super genius, could have replicated and modified any of the tech he may have examined while living in D'ni with Gehn. After all, look what Gehn was able to do while trapped in primitive conditions. Though I imagine SOMEONE had to drive all those rivets, screws and bolts we see. Perhaps to Atrus they were just decorative touches built in rather than functional.

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I'll look that up BRB


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 19, 2013 5:44 am 
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Obduction Backer

Joined: Tue Sep 19, 2006 4:33 am
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Although I had confirmation from Dr. Watson that the Descriptive book for earth was here, or at least in the possession of the DRC, I don't know if that means that Atrus had it.

However, his experiences with Stoneship, and Riven, and other experiments lead me to believe that he would be extremely hesitant about altering it to build himself a home. That's more something I would expect from Gehn. Atrus was much more respectful of the Art.

I feel the same way about him using the Bahro, assuming he had any knowledge of them at the time. Even if he had known them, I don't see Atrus, who witnessed terrible acts by his father, using another species like that. Unless he had some kind of friendship with them at that time. Unfortunately, records about the Bahro are extremely scarce. However, I would think that we would have seen some mention of them in somebody's journal if they had helped to build Tomahna.

No, I think it far more likely that after he found the D'ni survivors, they helped him build Tomahna, perhaps using advanced D'ni construction techniques. As the quote you mentioned said, they moved there after he finished writing Releeshahn. The D'ni survivors were found as late as 1812 (some records indicate it may have been earlier), some three years before the Stranger's first visit to Tomahna.

Also, according to our records, the Stranger didn't see all of Tomahna until 1824, so it's possible that all the additional buildings were actually constructed later.


As for his other Ages, most, if not all of the ages that Atrus wrote had thriving civilizations on them. So the native peoples could have helped him. And, when designing an age, the writer is free to add in things like buildings. It's just harder to do after the initial link is established without shifting the link. Also remember that Cathrine was quite the writer as well (reports say that she was likely much more skilled than Atrus), and could easily have helped with these efforts.

Also, many of Atrus ages were written before his sons were trapped in Haven and Spire. He easily could have gotten free labor from them. What father doesn't put his sons to work on his crazy projects?


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