It is currently Wed Dec 02, 2020 9:39 pm

All times are UTC




Forum locked This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 12 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Which one?
PostPosted: Wed Jun 10, 2009 10:52 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2008 9:40 pm
Posts: 142
Okay... I'm 12 years old... I know it would be extremely hard to learn any of these... Most people would think because of my age, but my thoughts are: There is no age limit to learning/knowledge... So, my question: Which do YOU reccomend learning first: Java or C++? Which is easier, and what about C#? Thanks.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 10, 2009 11:17 pm 
Offline
Obduction Backer

Joined: Mon Apr 30, 2007 7:34 pm
Posts: 411
Location: First trailer to the right, and straight down till morning.
Failure is only certain for those who never try.

To be honest, the answer to your question really depends on what it is your trying to program. If your looking to program stand-alone applications or games, C++ is a good choice. If you looking to program web apps or for websites, Java is good. Of interest, if you looking to do programing for Uru when the source code is released, Python is the language for you.

Btw, I was 13 when I first started programming in QBasic. :wink:

_________________
As Long as there is MORE, I will explore.
And as long as my Relto shelf is unfilled, I will build.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2009 2:08 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2008 9:40 pm
Posts: 142
greendragoon wrote:
Failure is only certain for those who never try.

To be honest, the answer to your question really depends on what it is your trying to program. If your looking to program stand-alone applications or games, C++ is a good choice. If you looking to program web apps or for websites, Java is good. Of interest, if you looking to do programing for Uru when the source code is released, Python is the language for you.

Btw, I was 13 when I first started programming in QBasic. :wink:
Okay... I'll probably go with learning Python and Java the most... I might as well learn C++ though... It wouldn't hurt to anyway! :D But yeah... Probably Java will be what I focus on the most... And some Python... Then I'll just learn C++ for fun or whatever... lol


BTW: Where could I find good tutorials/lessons for Python, Java, and C++?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2009 3:15 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2008 9:40 pm
Posts: 142
Ummm... Does anyone know where I could get the "Java Compiler" for Windows XP Home edition?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2009 3:32 pm 
Offline
Obduction Backer

Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 2:00 am
Posts: 1669
Location: Lakewood, WA
http://java.sun.com/javase/downloads/?intcmp=1281


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 9:03 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2008 9:40 pm
Posts: 142
semplerfi wrote:
http://java.sun.com/javase/downloads/?intcmp=1281
Which download do I click on? :?: :?:


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2009 9:19 pm 
Offline
Obduction Backer

Joined: Sat Aug 12, 2006 5:46 am
Posts: 1621
Location: Here, there, you know. Around.
JDK stands for Java Developer Kit. It includes all the critical stuff you need for developing java appelets (which are more powerful than just online browser based stuff.. java's key fact is that it's cross-platform by using a virtual machine design... if you look you'll notice a mass of the assorted Myst apps announced here and elsewhere use Java). JDK is the one you want.

JRE is the Java Runtime Environment. It's what you need to run java code, but won't let you make them. It's included in the JDK anyways I believe.


C++ isn't easy, nor is Java, but it's nice to learn Java first to get an idea of some of the OOP concepts etc that come up later.

_________________
You know, I wish we would learn Atrus loved the 1812 overture, and in turn we had a copy for our relto.
That's right, a canon canen cannon!

MOULa KI: #00027582 #7425022
100% Authentic Gondar! Accept no substitutes, imitations, or knock-offs!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2009 11:30 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2008 9:40 pm
Posts: 142
Gondar wrote:
JDK stands for Java Developer Kit. It includes all the critical stuff you need for developing java appelets (which are more powerful than just online browser based stuff.. java's key fact is that it's cross-platform by using a virtual machine design... if you look you'll notice a mass of the assorted Myst apps announced here and elsewhere use Java). JDK is the one you want.

JRE is the Java Runtime Environment. It's what you need to run java code, but won't let you make them. It's included in the JDK anyways I believe.


C++ isn't easy, nor is Java, but it's nice to learn Java first to get an idea of some of the OOP concepts etc that come up later.
Which JDK download do i select for a Windows XP Home Edition platform?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 12:03 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 9:16 pm
Posts: 367
Location: Montana
I would download the one listed here: http://java.sun.com/javase/downloads/netbeans.html. That includes the JDK and the Netbeans IDE. IDE = Integrated Development Environment.

If you decide that you don't like Netbeans; there is always the Eclipse IDE: http://www.eclipse.org/

Sun's Java tutorials are here: http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/index.html. While they're a good read by themselves; tutorials are much more effective if you have a project in mind. It could be a good idea to buy a text book and follow through the lessons listed in there paying special attention to the exercises at the end of each chapter.

_________________
Through space and time; along the threads of the stars; we seek the knowledge and wisdom of the ages.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 5:57 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2008 9:40 pm
Posts: 142
Teedyo wrote:
I would download the one listed here: http://java.sun.com/javase/downloads/netbeans.html. That includes the JDK and the Netbeans IDE. IDE = Integrated Development Environment.

If you decide that you don't like Netbeans; there is always the Eclipse IDE: http://www.eclipse.org/

Sun's Java tutorials are here: http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/index.html. While they're a good read by themselves; tutorials are much more effective if you have a project in mind. It could be a good idea to buy a text book and follow through the lessons listed in there paying special attention to the exercises at the end of each chapter.
What's the difference between the "eclipse ide for any java developers" and the "eclipse ide for java ee developers"? :?: :?:


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:55 pm 
Offline
Obduction Backer

Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 4:33 pm
Posts: 878
Location: Jurupa Valley, CA USA
abelc wrote:
What's the difference between the "eclipse ide for any java developers" and the "eclipse ide for java ee developers"? :?: :?:


Java EE (Enterprise Edition) - "The Java platform (Enterprise Edition) differs from the Java Standard Edition Platform (Java SE) in that it adds libraries which provide functionality to deploy fault-tolerant, distributed, multi-tier Java software, based largely on modular components running on an application server."

Sounds like it would probably be a bit overkill for your needs. Go with the regular one. :wink:

_________________
MOULa KI #32712
MOULa KI #23298
MOUL KI #35129
D'mala KI #74265
Gehn KI #10113


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 7:26 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2008 9:40 pm
Posts: 142
Deledrius wrote:
abelc wrote:
What's the difference between the "eclipse ide for any java developers" and the "eclipse ide for java ee developers"? :?: :?:


Java EE (Enterprise Edition) - "The Java platform (Enterprise Edition) differs from the Java Standard Edition Platform (Java SE) in that it adds libraries which provide functionality to deploy fault-tolerant, distributed, multi-tier Java software, based largely on modular components running on an application server."

Sounds like it would probably be a bit overkill for your needs. Go with the regular one. :wink:
Thanks


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Forum locked This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 12 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to: